Huge Victory! – Edison Packs it In! – UPDATED

...and, as the sun sinks in the west, we bid farewell to SONGS...


EON sends CONGRATULATIONS TO SAN CLEMENTE GREEN, SANONOFRESAFETY.ORG, ROSE, FRIENDS OF THE EARTH, FAIREWINDS, WOMENS ENERGY MATTERS, AND ALL WHO HAVE WORKED SO LONG AND HARD FOR THIS DAY! What a great team we’ve all been!
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It’s Official!!!
Southern California Utility Says It Will Close Troubled San Onofre Nuclear Power Plant

Activists held a celebratory news conference Fri. June 7, 2013, at the nuclear power plant.

San Clemente Green Presidnet Gary Headrick makes a point at a press conference hled by anti-nuclear advocates at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. Photo by Jim Shilander

“It has great national implications and is a real strong message that this nation does not need nuclear power,” said Shaun Burnie, of Friends of the Earth.

Democratic US Senator Barbara Boxer said she was “greatly relieved that the San Onofre nuclear plant will be closed permanently… This nuclear plant had a defective redesign and could no longer operate as intended.”

“This is very much a self-inflicted wound (by Southern California Edison),” said Arnie Gunderson, a nuclear engineer who has worked closely with Friends of the Earth over the last year to push for the closure. “Continuing to operate this plant was just not safe, and I think Edison realized that and decided to throw in the towel. This is a seismic decision for the nuclear power industry in this country and worldwide.”

Carol Jahnkow of San Diego’s Peace Resource Center called the closure a direct result of activists’ work “This is a real victory for people power, and don’t anybody forget that,” she said. Anti-SONGS Activists Overjoyed by Shutdown News
EYE ON SC, News Headlines | June 7, 2013 by Staff
By Jim Shilander

For anti-nuclear advocates, Friday morning’s news that Southern California Edison would close San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station meant the end of a long fight for the many prominent activists who came together for a celebratory press conference in front of SONGS, the mood was jubilant.

Gary Headrick, the leader of San Clemente Green, which has been fighting the effort to restart the plant, was ecstatic by the news.

“It’s a huge relief and very emotional,” Headrick said. “The only thing I can compare would be the days my children were born and there’s all that anxiety and stress, you want it to come out right. And then comes the moment where the reality is they’re healthy and they’re happy. It’s the same with this nuclear power plant. It’s incredible to think what was at stake and how incredibly important today is, not just for San Onofre, but Diablo Canyon and other nuclear power plants around the world that have this old technology.”More…

Jun 7, 2013
San Onofre is Dead & So is Nuclear Power
Harvey Wasserman – NukeFree.org

From his California beach house at San Clemente, Richard Nixon once watched three reactors rise at nearby San Onofre. As of June 7, 2013, all three are permanently shut.

It’s a monumental victory for grassroots activism. it marks an epic transition in how we get our energy….

… As of early this year, Southern California Edison’s path to a re-start at San Onofre seemed as clear as any to be expected by a traditional atomic tyrannosaur.

But with help from Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) and Senator-to-be Ed Markey (D-MA), a powerful citizen uprising stopped it dead.

So did the terrifying incompetence and greed that has defined the nuclear industry from the days of Nixon and before. More…

Activists praise San Onofre closure, but 1,100 layoffs expected
By Abby Sewell – LA Times – June 7, 2013, 9:02 a.m.

Anti-nuclear activists and Sen. Barbara Boxer celebrated Southern California Edison’s announcement Friday that the troubled San Onofre nuclear plant will be permanently retired. More...

Calif. utility to close troubled nuclear plant
By MICHAEL R. BLOOD, Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In a jolt to the nation’s nuclear power industry, the owners of Southern California’s San Onofre plant announced Friday they are shutting it down for good after the discovery of damaged equipment led critics to charge it could never operate safely again.

…Environmentalists celebrated outside the front gates of the beachfront plant, and a pack of bicyclists shouted, “Shut it down!” as they went past.
Gary Headrick of San Clemente Green likened the news to births of his children: “The joy and the relief is comparable to something that big in my life, to know that 8 million people will be safe now from this supposed restart.”

…It will take months, and possibly years, to complete the closing of the reactors, known as decommissioning. It will involve removing all fuel from the reactor cores.

Edison’s stock price was up slightly in midday trading.

Friends of the Earth, an advocacy group critical that was waging a battle to block the restart, praised the decision to close it.

“We have long said that these reactors are too dangerous to operate and now Edison has agreed. The people of California now have the opportunity to move away from the failed promise of dirty and dangerous nuclear power and replace it with the safe and clean energy provided by the sun and the wind,” the group’s president, Erich Pica, said in a statement.

Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., chairman of the Environment and Public Works Committee, said she, too, was relieved.

“This nuclear plant had a defective redesign and could no longer operate as intended. Modifications to the San Onofre nuclear plant were unsafe and posed a danger to the 8 million people living within 50 miles of the plant,” she said. More…

Published on Friday, June 7, 2013 by Common Dreams
Win!: California’s San Onofre Nuclear Plant to Close Permanently
“The people of California now have the opportunity to move away from the failed promise of dirty and dangerous nuclear power and replace it with the safe and clean energy provided by the sun and the wind”
– Andrea Germanos, staff writer

In a victory for anti-nuclear activists, the trouble-stricken San Onofre nuclear plant is set to close permanently.

The plant’s operator, Southern California Edison, made the announcement on Friday.
The closing of San Onofre “is very good news for the people of Southern California,” said Erich Pica, president of Friends of the Earth (FOE). More…

California glitch-ridden nuclear plant shut down for good
By Agence France-Presse
…Southern California Edison (SCE) has been trying to fix problems which came to light last year after a minor leak in one reactor at the San Onofre plant, north of San Diego in southern California.

But SCE parent company Edison International’s chairman Ted Craver said experts had finally concluded that they cannot resolve the problems quickly or comprehensively enough.

“We have concluded that the continuing uncertainty about when or if (San Onofre) might return to service was not good for our customers, our investors, or the need to plan for our region’s long-term electricity needs,” he said.

The shutdown will mean the loss of some 1,100 jobs, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Anti-nuclear activists hailed the announcement. “It has great national implications and is a real strong message that this nation does not need nuclear power,” Shaun Burnie, of Friends of the Earth, told the newspaper.

Democratic US Senator Barbara Boxer said she was “greatly relieved that the San Onofre nuclear plant will be closed permanently… This nuclear plant had a defective redesign and could no longer operate as intended.” More…

Timeline of San Onofre plant’s operations
By U-T San Diego 1:21 p.m.June 7, 2013

Workers, surfers, pols react to San Onofre
By Mark Walker10:47 a.m.June 7, 2013

Workers at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station said they were taken by surprise with Southern California Edison’s early Friday announcement that it is closing the plant.
So too were many of the environmentalists that have lobbied to close the plant. About a dozen shutdown advocates gathered in front of the seaside generation facility by mid-morning to celebrate its shuttering.

“This is very much a self-inflicted wound (by Southern California Edison),” said Arnie Gunderson, a nuclear engineer who has worked closely with Friends of the Earth over the last year to push for the closure. “Continuing to operate this plant was just not safe, and I think Edison realized that and decided to throw in the towel. This is a seismic decision for the nuclear power industry in this country and worldwide.”

Carol Jahnkow of San Diego’s Peace Resource Center called the closure a direct result of activists’ work “This is a real victory for people power, and don’t anybody forget that,” she said. More…

What went wrong at San Onofre
Vibrations caused premature wear in the tubes carrying heated water

Graphic shows what went wrong at San Onofre

7 things to know about San Onofre
Why California’s first large commercial nuclear reactor is closing, what happens next
By U-T San Diego 10 a.m.June 7, 2013

Years of cleanup
Decommissioning a nuclear power plant is a tightly regulated process with a 50-year time frame. It requires removing and disposing of radioactive components such as the reactor and associated piping and cleaning up radioactive or hazardous contamination in the buildings and on the site. The costs are enormous.

The Cost Of Power Post-San Onofre
Friday, June 7, 2013
By Hailey Persinger
How much will it cost to power your home now that San Onofre is offline for good? Short answer: possibly more. More…

AP/ June 7, 2013, 10:02 AM
Calif. utility to retire troubled San Onofre nuclear power plant
LOS ANGELES The troubled San Onofre nuclear power plant in Southern California is closing, after an epic 16-month battle over whether the twin reactors could be safely returned to service, officials announced Friday. More…

Calif. utility will close troubled nuclear plant
By MICHAEL R. BLOOD; Associated Press
The troubled San Onofre nuclear power plant on the California coast is closing after an epic 16-month battle over whether the twin reactors could be safely restarted with millions of people living nearby, officials announced Friday. More…

SCE Press Release:
Edison International : Southern California Edison Announces Plans to Retire San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

Company Will Continue Its Work with State Agencies on Electric Grid Reliability
Southern California Edison (SCE) has decided to permanently retire Units 2 and 3 of its San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS).

“SONGS has served this region for over 40 years,” said Ted Craver, Chairman and CEO of Edison International, parent company of SCE, “but we have concluded that the continuing uncertainty about when or if SONGS might return to service was not good for our customers, our investors, or the need to plan for our region’s long-term electricity needs.”

Both SONGS units have been shut down safely since January 2012. Unit 2 was taken out of service January 9, 2012, for a planned routine outage. Unit 3 was safely taken offline January 31, 2012, after station operators detected a small leak in a tube inside a steam generator manufactured by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI). Two steam generators manufactured by MHI were installed in Unit 2 in 2009 and two more were installed in Unit 3 in 2010, one of which developed the leak.

In connection with the decision, SCE estimates that it will record a charge in the second quarter of between $450 million and $650 million before taxes ($300 million – $425 million after tax), in accordance with accounting requirements.

After months of analysis and tests, SCE submitted a restart plan to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in October 2012. SCE proposed to safely restart Unit 2 at a reduced power level (70 %) for an initial period of approximately five months. That plan was based on work done by engineering groups from three independent firms with expertise in steam generator design and manufacturing.

The NRC has been reviewing SCE’s plans for restart of Unit 2 for the last eight months, during which several public meetings have been held. A recent ruling by an adjudicatory arm of the NRC, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board, creates further uncertainty regarding when a final decision might be made on restarting Unit 2. Additional administrative processes and appeals could result in delay of more than a year. During this period, the costs of maintaining SONGS in a state of readiness to restart and the costs to replace the power SONGS previously provided would continue. Moreover, it is uneconomic for SCE and its customers to bear the long-term repair costs for returning SONGS to full power operation without restart of Unit 2. SCE has concluded that efforts are better focused on planning for the replacement generation and transmission resources which will be required for grid reliability.

“Looking ahead,” said Ron Litzinger, SCE’s President, “we think that our decision to retire the units will eliminate uncertainty and facilitate orderly planning for California’s energy future.”
Litzinger noted that the company has worked with the California Independent System Operator, the California Energy Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission in planning for Southern California’s energy needs and will continue to do so.

“The company is already well into a summer reliability program and has completed numerous transmission upgrades in addition to those completed last year,” Litzinger said. “Thanks to consumer conservation, energy efficiency programs and a moderate summer, the region was able to get through last summer without electricity shortages. We hope for the same positive result again this year,” Litzinger added, “although generation outages, soaring temperatures or wildfires impacting transmission lines would test the system.”

In connection with the retirement of Units 2 and 3, San Onofre anticipates reducing staff over the next year from approximately 1,500 to approximately 400 employees, subject to applicable regulatory approvals. The majority of such reductions are expected to occur in 2013.

“This situation is very unfortunate,” said Pete Dietrich, SCE’s Chief Nuclear Officer, noting that “this is an extraordinary team of men and women. We will treat them fairly.” SCE will work to ensure a fair process for this transition, and will work with the Utility Workers Union of America (UWUA) and the International Brotherhood of Electric Workers (IBEW) on transition plans for the employees they represent.
SCE also recognizes its continuing safety responsibilities as it moves toward decommissioning of the units. SCE’s top priority will be to ensure a safe, orderly, and compliant retirement of these units. Full retirement of the units prior to decommissioning will take some years in accordance with customary practices. Actual decommissioning will take many years until completion. Such activities will remain subject to the continued oversight of the NRC.

SCE intends to pursue recovery of damages from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, the supplier of the replacement steam generators, as well as recovery of amounts under applicable insurance policies.
For updates, please visitwww.SONGScommunity.com, or follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/SCE_SONGS and on www.facebook.com/SCE.

San Onofre is jointly owned by SCE (78.21 percent), San Diego Gas & Electric (20 percent) and the city of Riverside (1.79 percent).

About Southern California Edison
An Edison International (NYSE:EIX) company, Southern California Edison is one of the nation’s largest electric utilities, serving a population of nearly 14 million via 4.9 million customer accounts in a 50,000-square-mile service area within Central, Coastal and Southern California.

Southern California Edison
Media Contact:
Media Relations
626-302-2255
or
Investor Relations Contact:
Scott Cunningham
626-302-2540

James P. Avery
Senior Vice President
San Diego Gas & Electric
858-650-6102

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